520
520 points
Loading...
MODERN ADIRE ON THE RUN WAY

Adire (Yoruba — tie and dye) textile is the indigo dyed cloth made in south western Nigeria by Yoruba women, using a variety of resist dye techniques.

As the translation of the name suggests, the earliest pieces of this type were probably simple tied designs on cotton cloth handspun and woven locally (rather like those still produced in Mali), but in the early decades of the 20th century new access to large quantities of imported shirting material via the spread of European textile merchants in Abeokuta and other Yoruba towns caused a boom in these women’s entrepreneurial and artistic efforts, making adire a major local craft in Abeokuta and Ibadan, attracting buyers from all over West Africa. The cloth’s basic shape became that of two pieces of shirting material stitched together to create a women’s wrapper cloth.

New techniques of resist dyeing developed, such as “adire eleko” (hand-painting designs onto cloth with a cassava starch paste prior to dyeing), along with a new style more suited to rapid mass production (using metal stencils cut from the sheets of tin that lined tea chests, using sewn raffia and/or tied sections, or folding the cloths repeatedly before tying or stitching them in place). Most of the designs were named, with popular ones including the jubilee pattern, (first produced for the silver jubilee of George V and Queen Mary in 1935), Olokun (“goddess of the sea”), and Ibadadun (“Ibadan is sweet”).

Loading...

However, by the end of the 1930s the spread of synthetic indigo and caustic soda and an influx of new less skilled entrants caused quality problems and a still-present collapse in demand. Though the more complex and beautiful starch resist designs continued to be produced until the early 1970s, but despite a revival prompted largely by the interest of US Peace Corps workers in the 1960s, never regained their earlier popularity. In the present day simplified stencilled designs and some better quality tie & die and stitch-resist designs are still produced, but local taste favours “kampala” (multi-coloured wax resist cloth, sometimes also known as adire by a few people).



LATEST NEWS & JOBS SUBSCRIPTION

Be 1st to know! Join over 8000+ others receiving our latest news, job vacancies, and other cool stuff direct to their inbox.

Thank you for subscribing.

Something went wrong.

Powered by Best Social Sharing Plugin for WordPress Easy Social Shre Buttons


Like it? Share with your friends!

520
520 points

What's Your Reaction?

Lol Lol
0
Lol
Love Love
0
Love
angry angry
0
angry
Like Like
0
Like
Dislike Dislike
0
Dislike
omg omg
0
omg
Admin

0 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Please Share

Spread the word. Let your friends know!
Later
This window will automatically close in 14 seconds
Choose A Format
Personality quiz
Series of questions that intends to reveal something about the personality
Trivia quiz
Series of questions with right and wrong answers that intends to check knowledge
Poll
Voting to make decisions or determine opinions
Story
Formatted Text with Embeds and Visuals
List
The Classic Internet Listicles
Countdown
The Classic Internet Countdowns
Open List
Submit your own item and vote up for the best submission
Ranked List
Upvote or downvote to decide the best list item
Meme
Upload your own images to make custom memes
Video
Youtube, Vimeo or Vine Embeds
Audio
Soundcloud or Mixcloud Embeds
Image
Photo or GIF
Gif
GIF format
LATEST NEWS & JOBS SUBSCRIPTION

Be 1st to know! Join over 8000+ others receiving our latest news, job vacancies, and other cool stuff direct to their inbox.

Thank you for subscribing.

Something went wrong.

Powered by Best Social Sharing Plugin for WordPress Easy Social Share Buttons
LATEST NEWS & JOBS SUBSCRIPTION

Be 1st to know! Join over 8000+ others receiving our latest news, job vacancies, and other cool stuff direct to their inbox.

Thank you for subscribing.

Something went wrong.

Powered by Best Social Sharing Plugin for WordPress Easy Social Share Buttons